Archive for September, 2016

The Brooklyn Invitational Custom Motorcycle Show 2016

Posted in Uncategorized on September 26, 2016 by Pat Regan

Before I get to the Brooklyn Invitational, may I say how pleased I am to be able to see this beautiful helmet every day! I bought this helmet as described in my last post. Live Fast, Take Chances. I love it! Thanks to the folks at Indian Larry! And a big thanks to Darren McKeag for creating this work of art. And once again congratulations to Darren and Missy who were married this past weekend.


All of these events, from the Motorcycle Film Festival, to the Indian Larry Block Party, to the Brooklyn Invitational have been great! If you haven’t been to Sturgis, then you don’t know about the illness that comes with it. Post Sturgis Depression can hit hard. These events here in NYC are good medicine to heal the summertime blues and ease you into the seasonal change.

Now off to the Brooklyn Invitational Custom Motorcycle Show at Root Studios.


What the heck! We took the ferry again! Hopefully Bonnie will understand.


Besides…Bloody Mary’s and riding don’t mix.


There’s this new thing taking place on the walls of buildings all over Williamsburg. The walls of the neighborhood buildings are quickly being covered with hand painted advertisements. They are everywhere. I love the art of the streets and these do fill the hood with color, but I am not sure I like corporate america taking the canvas of the streets as their own.


When we turned onto 14th street, bikes were lined up for blocks.



This old pick up was parked outside the Gutter.


The bike below raised an eyebrow! It is made to look like a rough and rugged, road trippin bike. It has the blanket over the seat, the rolled up duffel with an extra blanket and a fire extinguisher. But upon closer inspection, this bike looks like it was just backed out of a van and placed here. Those tires have never hit the road and that chain was pristine like the pipes. WTF!


Where there are cool old bikes, there are cool old cars. Although I am sure that guy behind the wheel would correct me and say, “It’s a truck!”



Well this is not a truck.


Over at Works Engineering they were hauling their bikes back into the garage.



Below is another example of the hand painted ads I spoke of earlier. Like I said, they are everywhere!



I had a great shot of the Eat Shit chopper pulling up last year.


There were bad ass bikes everywhere! All kinds!








And Shovelheads!


Both sides of the street were lined with bikes.









Although the bikes outside were numerous and impressive, it was inside that the actual show took place.


The studio was filled with many well crafted machines for the 8th Annual Brooklyn Invitational Custom Motorcycle Show.








In the center studio there were bands. And in the far studio there were vendors and tattoo artists applying their trade.


By the time we got back outside, it was getting dark.



It’s fun to watch the procession of bikes as they roar by.



Some hopped on and turned their engines over with the click of a starter.


Others pushed downhill for kick start.


The results were the same, bikes were thinning out as the sounds from twisting throttles echoed in the distant streets.



It was another fun day in Brooklyn!



It was time to catch the last forking ferry and go home.


The Indian Larry 13th Annual Grease Monkey Block Party

Posted in Uncategorized on September 24, 2016 by Pat Regan


Last Saturday was the Indian Larry 13th Annual Grease Monkey Block Party!


As this day would include tasty beverages, I left the bike parked on my island and we took the ferry to Brooklyn.


Before the block party we went to Café de la Esquina on Wythe Street and filled the belly with goodness.




Then on to 15th Street for the festivities. Actually we entered on 14th Street through the back of Indian Larry’s shop.


The streets are lined with bikes from Larry’s shop along with many vintage beauties.


Endo Makoto was on hand to do his remarkable chopstick paintings. Here he is painting an Indian Larry bike.



We bumped into this dude Kenny who we met the night before when he had just pulled up with his track racer on the back of a pick up truck. img_185454l

Kenny was at the block party promoting vintage motorcycle track races, the Appalachian Moto Jam and his site The Moto Jam looks like fun! It takes place October 8th in Cuddlebackville, NY.





Besides the many motorcycles, there are always some vintage 4 wheeled machines about the neighborhood.



While cutting through Indian Larry’s shop to get to 15th Street we saw Bean’re’s bike parked in the garage. This is a huge motorcycle! Bean’re is a bigger than life character in the bike world.


Bean’re was selling a couple books he wrote. I got his bio and am presently reading it. I have read enough to know Bean’re’s first bike was a Triumph!


And here’s the Bean’re boots! They are proportionately sized with his bike. Bean’re lives large.


Meet Timo and his nut sak. He was set up next to Bean’re. He rolled down to the block party from across the border to the North. In Canada he makes these waterproof duffles called nut saks as well as other leather goods.


This is Timo’s shop Mad Squirrel Leather.


Here’s a look inside Larry’s shop.


While in Larry’s shop we met Gloria Struck and her daughter Lori. Gloria is 91 years old and still riding to Sturgis and Daytona from her home in New Jersey. She has been riding since 1941!


This October Gloria will be inducted into the AMA Hall of Fame!


Gloria has ridden all 48 states numerous times as well as travels throughout Europe. Below is a photo I grabbed from the net of Gloria posing with David Uhl and a painting he did of her as a young lady. She is a super sweet and laid back lady.


I saw this guy in the blue shirt passing by. I said, “Hey! Aren’t you the guy who gave a bike to Mothership at Sturgis?” Indeed it was! Meet Mike from Chop Machine Cycles.


At Sturgis Mike rolled the Sportster he built on to the stage. He had just won the custom Sporster contest. Then Mike gave the bike to the band! What a blast! Mothership fucking rocks and the addition of “White Chocolate” made it an even wilder time!





Looking in NYCMC. New York City Motorcycle is on 14th Street.


I flipped out when I saw the Evel Knievel stunt cycle. The owner Larry then took it outside for a demonstration. Nice! I hadn’t seen mini Evel ride since the seventies!


Outside of NYCMC.


Back to the Block Party! More bikes.





And Rock n Roll! This old dude was swinging around a tomahawk and having a swell time.


Finally after a long, fun filled day it was time to go home.


It was a great day! But there’s more! One thing I haven’t mentioned yet and it comes with a story.


I used to paint signs. I worked for a guy named Jaime. He was a master of the brush stroke from Guatemala who came to New York, fell in love and married a Scientologist. I’m not sure how they didn’t see it, but that marriage didn’t turn out well. That was an underlying drama going on at the time, but for me it was a fun time. Before I met him, Jaime used to hang from scaffolding to paint giant billboards in Times Square. Now he was on his own and he took me on to assist him. This guy Gottlieb (who owned half of Greenwich Village) let us use one of his buildings on Little West 12th Street. It was a huge 12 story building with a car elevator. When Jaime was having marital problems he would sleep in a van parked within the building. We went around the Village door to door soliciting for signs. We did good business. We ended up painting many signs around the city. In fact at one job on 9th Avenue and 44th Street, we were doing a job for a photography shop and right there on the street I painted my first car flat black with a paint brush. It was a 1971 AMC Matador I bought for $300.


I could park my car in that building on Little West 12th Street too. Since it had an elevator I randomly placed my ride wherever I wanted in that empty warehouse of a building. I’ll bet that building is worth at least 20 million dollars today. Those were different times.

But that’s not the point. The point is, Jaime taught me the art of the One Shot brush stroke. It takes an artful, steady, confident hand to guide the sign painter’s brush filled with the glossy enamel of One Shot. I would watch Jaime and do my best to mimic his hand, but quickly recognized this was a master I was following.

When I saw the work of Darren McKeag, I saw for the first time in 30 years another master of the One Shot brush stroke. Below is a helmet he painted from his Instagram page.


And here is another shot he posted of the helmet in the progress of being painted in his studio. If you look closely you can still see the sketch beneath the paint. Beautiful! I have praised The work of Darren McKeag many times on this site. I have bought a print and a T-shirt of his work in the past. I bumped into him at Sturgis this Summer as well as seeing more of his artwork at the Buffalo Chip.


But last Saturday while in Indian Larry’s shop. I was looking at helmets. I wanted to try on the Gringo helmet by Biltwell. Presently I wear the Bonanza open face helmet. As I was looking at the many helmets I noticed the helmet Darren had painted on the top shelf. At first I though it was possibly a manufactured helmet using McKeag’s design. But once I held it I recognized the artistry and the brush stroke that I admire so much. And it was for sale!


I couldn’t believe it! It was in a price range that smarts a little but I could swing it. I was not going to let this opportunity to own an original McKeag go by. I bought it and still can’t believe this is mine! Below is a photo of Jillian wearing it.


Not only am I honored to have this work of art, proceeds from the sale go to the Aiden Jack Seeger Foundation. Aidan Jack Seeger Foundation was established to address the need for information and newborn screening with respect to Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). In addition they help and support families to cope with the demands of the disease. So a win, win!

I was hoping to see Darren himself at the Block Party but he wan’t around this year.


I am told Darren and his fiancée Missy are getting married this weekend.

So here’s to Darren and Missy! Cheers!


4th Annual Motorcycle Film Festival

Posted in Uncategorized on September 21, 2016 by Pat Regan


This past Friday night, Jillian and I went to the Motorcycle Film Festival at the Gutter in Brooklyn.


Friday was one of 4 nights that the Gutter hosts this film festival dedicated to movies about bikers and motorcycles.



Before the show we walked around the neighborhood.



This part of Williamsburg is filled with great graffiti and vintage vehicles.



We arrived a little late and missed the first 2 short films. One was 30 seconds long and the other a little over 4 minutes.

The first film we saw was, “Take None Give None” a full length documentary about the Chosen Few Motorcycle Club. I first read about the Chosen Few on The Selvedge Yard a few years back. The Chosen Few MC was the first racially integrated motorcycle club in the United States. They began as an all black motorcycle club in 1959 and integrated in 1960. These were racially charged times when segregation was the norm, but for the Chosen Few the brotherhood of integration made them stronger.

Here is the film’s teaser. Filmmaker: Gusmano Cesaretti

Following “Take None Give None” was a short film called “Vintage Steele, A Day in the Life”. It was basically a music video depicting a full day at a bike shop (Vintage Steele) in Vermont. Filmmaker: Daniel Schechner.

The night ended with a touching tribute to Richie “Pan” Panarra. The film was called “Richie Pan Forever”. I spoke of Richie in my post about Sturgis this Summer. The Buffalo Chip had a beautiful show dedicated to Richie’s art and art related to him. The thing that got me the most about that show was seeing his bike sitting alone on a pedestal.


When you hear of a biker’s passing, one assumes there is a mangled bike somewhere in the story. But Richie and his friend Michael “Nap” Napolitano were hit by a car and killed while crossing the street in North Carolina. They were there for the Smoke Out Rally.


So, “Richie Pan Forever” uses footage from a show called “Richie Pan’s America“. It tells Richie’s story through his own words intermingled with interviews by the people who knew him best. Without even knowing Richie, the power of the sorrow expressed by those who loved him was profound. Heart wrenching. Meeting his wife Cindy the following day made it even more devastating. She is bubbling with life. As she spoke of Richie, his art and their 3 children, the feelings of love and loss poured out with each word. All of these events in honor of this man has left me in awe. The Buffalo Chip show alone was amazing. In fact, when I got home from Sturgis I ordered a print of Richie painted by George Frizzell, AKA George the Painter, GTP. I’m looking forward to it’s arrival. Below is a photo I took of the original.


After the films we goofed off a bit taking photos and such, then headed home.



The following day would be the Indian Larry Block Party!