4th Annual Motorcycle Film Festival

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This past Friday night, Jillian and I went to the Motorcycle Film Festival at the Gutter in Brooklyn.

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Friday was one of 4 nights that the Gutter hosts this film festival dedicated to movies about bikers and motorcycles.

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Before the show we walked around the neighborhood.

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This part of Williamsburg is filled with great graffiti and vintage vehicles.

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We arrived a little late and missed the first 2 short films. One was 30 seconds long and the other a little over 4 minutes.

The first film we saw was, “Take None Give None” a full length documentary about the Chosen Few Motorcycle Club. I first read about the Chosen Few on The Selvedge Yard a few years back. The Chosen Few MC was the first racially integrated motorcycle club in the United States. They began as an all black motorcycle club in 1959 and integrated in 1960. These were racially charged times when segregation was the norm, but for the Chosen Few the brotherhood of integration made them stronger.

Here is the film’s teaser. Filmmaker: Gusmano Cesaretti

Following “Take None Give None” was a short film called “Vintage Steele, A Day in the Life”. It was basically a music video depicting a full day at a bike shop (Vintage Steele) in Vermont. Filmmaker: Daniel Schechner.

The night ended with a touching tribute to Richie “Pan” Panarra. The film was called “Richie Pan Forever”. I spoke of Richie in my post about Sturgis this Summer. The Buffalo Chip had a beautiful show dedicated to Richie’s art and art related to him. The thing that got me the most about that show was seeing his bike sitting alone on a pedestal.

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When you hear of a biker’s passing, one assumes there is a mangled bike somewhere in the story. But Richie and his friend Michael “Nap” Napolitano were hit by a car and killed while crossing the street in North Carolina. They were there for the Smoke Out Rally.

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So, “Richie Pan Forever” uses footage from a show called “Richie Pan’s America“. It tells Richie’s story through his own words intermingled with interviews by the people who knew him best. Without even knowing Richie, the power of the sorrow expressed by those who loved him was profound. Heart wrenching. Meeting his wife Cindy the following day made it even more devastating. She is bubbling with life. As she spoke of Richie, his art and their 3 children, the feelings of love and loss poured out with each word. All of these events in honor of this man has left me in awe. The Buffalo Chip show alone was amazing. In fact, when I got home from Sturgis I ordered a print of Richie painted by George Frizzell, AKA George the Painter, GTP. I’m looking forward to it’s arrival. Below is a photo I took of the original.

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After the films we goofed off a bit taking photos and such, then headed home.

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The following day would be the Indian Larry Block Party!

One Response to “4th Annual Motorcycle Film Festival”

  1. So glad you could go with such a lovely companion. I am overly sensitive to being alone since I lost my beloved in 2014.

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